Personal Definition of Nursing

Personal Definition of Nursing

This study guide talks about a personal definition of nursing. Study it to develop an excellent definition of nursing.

Introduction

What is nursing?

Nursing’s definition is constantly changing. Consumers of healthcare in today’s society expect high-quality service and want to be partners in their care. So, what does nursing entail for me? Nursing’s ability to change in response to the changing requirements of healthcare consumers. Individuality, beliefs and values, as well as life events, all play a role in nursing performance. Nursing entails not only comprehending but also applying a variety of nursing and non-nursing ideas, as well as state nurse practice statutes and the Nurse Code of Ethics.

To offer quality care, nurses communicate and collaborate with clients, families, and team members. During each client encounter, nursing requires careful listening and observation. Nursing aims to provide knowledge and direction at the same time in order to achieve the following goals: maintaining, regaining, or eliminating, managing, or minimizing bad health. Nursing is a comprehensive approach that combines beliefs, skills, ethical duties, and the application of a particular body of knowledge. It’s crucial to keep in mind that no single description applies to all nurses. “Trying to precisely convey the meaning is maybe almost as difficult as trying to define love since it is understood in so many different ways” (Manhart Barrett, 2002, p. 51).

Peculiar Aspects of Nursing

What are the unique aspects of nursing?

Nursing is an interesting and unique job that offers a lot of flexibility. Nursing does not have a predetermined educational path or a limited number of chances. Comparing and contrasting nursing with other professions highlights nursing’s fundamental uniqueness. Though both healthcare disciplines, evidence-based medicine, and evidence-based nursing have major differences. Nurses work with people’s reactions to health and illness. Nursing takes each client’s needs into account and involves a balance of “doing” and “being with” (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2002). This means that nurses are more likely to pay attention not only to the scientific aspects of care but also to the client’s sentiments.

Physicians, on the other hand, are usually focused on disease prevention or therapy. “Medicine is the surgery of functions, as surgery proper is the surgery of limbs and organs,” said Florence Nightingale (1860). (See p. 133). An allopathic approach to medicine is frequently used. “And what nursing has to accomplish,” Nightingale (1860) said, “is to place the patient in the best condition for nature to operate upon him.” (See p. 133).

Nurses, according to Nightingale, recognize that the environment, which is made up of many realms, plays a role in a patient’s or client’s state. Nurses, according to Nightingale (1860), should not just do what doctors and other professionals do, but rather do the best that nursing has to offer. (See p. 133). Nightingale, I believe, emphasized that nurses must provide specialized care to each client and be “present” in every scenario, regardless of how other healthcare professionals approach the matter.

Nursing as a Profession

What is nursing as a profession?

Nursing has long been claimed to be a profession, and for good cause. “The basic tenet of the professional paradigm is that professions “fix” something for society,” said Dr. Hildegard Peplau (Sills, 1998, p. 198). Society bestows some advantages on the profession in exchange for their applied expertise; the profession, in turn, has certain responsibilities. Nursing fulfills these responsibilities, which include: doing no harm, being skilled, upholding moral and ethical standards, controlling and establishing advancement requirements, disciplining those who fail to meet standards, and employing knowledge to treat and educate the public (Sills, 1998).

Although there is no universal agreement on what defines the proper features of a profession, the following criteria are frequently mentioned, according to Liaschenko & Peter (2004): a unique body of knowledge, selfless service to society, a code of ethics, substantial education and socialization, and autonomy in practice, i.e. reasonable independence in practice decision-making and management of the work situation and conditions (p. 489).

Nursing’s distinct body of knowledge is essential to me since it is made up of science, nursing theories, and conceptual frameworks derived from research; research thus allows nursing to be an evidence-based profession. Altruism can be integrated into nursing practice through teaching and learning. As a nurse, having unselfish concern for others without expecting an obvious reward, except feeling that someone would benefit or avoid harm, is a motivating factor (Shaw & Degazon, 2008, p. 45).

The Code of Ethics in nursing governs nurse behavior, defines nurse accountability, and establishes principles for the nurse-client interaction. Nursing skills must be competent in order to practice safely, and this is achieved not only through education but also through interaction with clients and their families. “Diverge from the concepts of autonomy and self-determination” the ability of nurses to successfully communicate and work with clients, families, and other members of the healthcare team about difficult matters (Shaw & Degazon, 2008). Nurses, in my opinion, must continue to strive for nursing’s recognition as a profession in order to maintain its long-term viability.

The Caring Concept in Nursing

What is the caring concept in nursing?

The profession of nursing is arguably driven by compassion. For a long time, research and theories on the concept of caring have been a part of the nursing profession. Nurses build bonds with their patients, their families, and their coworkers. Nurses frequently enter these interactions with a focus on deliberate caring, followed by respect and good listening. Understanding the mutual and reciprocal components of caring enables nurses to see beyond themselves or their ego and into a realm of possibilities (Lewis, 2003, p. 38).

The Caring Concept in Nursing
Personal Definition of Nursing

Possibilities enable the nurse to give clients hope, and hope gives people endurance and strength, as well as inspiration. When a nurse’s ability to care deteriorates, it affects the nurse’s ability to be present with clients (Lewis, 2003).

I often lose my capacity to set and plan realistic goals, self-reflect, and make decisions the instant I intentionally decide that I will not care about a task, scenario, person, etc. As a result, I believe that a nurse who puts in little effort or decides not to care at all will have a limited ability to exercise self-determination. Without the inclusion of the caring notion, I believe the nursing profession as we know it today would not exist or function.

Personal Philosophy of Nursing

What is your personal nursing philosophy?

Nursing, like other professions, has a philosophical underpinning that tries to define and justify the profession’s existence. My personal perspective is that selfless service pleases God and his plan for my life and that it is my responsibility to serve not only the Lord, but also mankind with passion, dedication, and humility. My philosophy is based on my understanding of the Gospels or the Holy Bible, and it is supported by my own experience. My philosophy reflects my personal beliefs, which lead me to choose nursing as my major and future career.

Because she received a call to serve God and obeyed, Florence Nightingale, became the hardworking, disciplined, practicing mystic who is venerated today (Dossey, 2010, p.10). I understand that caring for others is not always simple. I am certain that having a clearly expressed personal philosophy will assist me in approaching activities and situations with empathy. My personal perspective, I believe, will also benefit my professional development and spiritual journey.

Influential Factors in Nursing

What factors influence you to become a nurse?

Influential Factors in Nursing
Personal Definition of Nursing

I announced as a child that I wanted to be a nurse like my mother. After all, she was the most amazing person I’d ever encountered in my little existence. I recall wanting to put on a nice, bright outfit and assist people in their moment of need. To be honest, I had not realized how much devotion and hard work the nursing profession entailed. My perspective of a nurse shifted about sixth grade. I began to experience several asthma exacerbations, which resulted in multiple hospitalizations.

My doctor was simply interested in using his expertise and experience to help me manage my illness. One of my nurses once shown her genuine concern for me by communicating with me on a spiritual level while delivering therapeutic care. I don’t think medication would have been able to entirely restore my health on its own. Altruism may have affected my nurse and doctor. However, I believe that only my nurse was able to demonstrate important characteristics of selfless service by moving beyond her ego via loving and spirituality.

Nursing Theories

What theories are pertinent to nursing?

The nursing profession can benefit from Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring and Madeleine Leininger’s Theory of Cultural Care. Care and culture, according to Leininger (2002), are inextricably linked. “Care is the essence of nursing, and it is the core, dominant, and unifying emphasis of nursing,” she claims (p.192). To explore and direct research that creates knowledge for the progress of nursing, it is vital to identify a core or central emphasis, such as caring.

Nursing, according to Leinenger, is both scientific and humanistic, and the profession’s concentration is on human care phenomena and actions (McCance, McKenna, & Boore, 1999, p. 1390). I feel that nurses have a unique chance to help break through cultural barriers, reflecting God’s desire to care for people through providing observable and tangible service. Leininger (2002) has even stated that acknowledging God’s creativity and caring character is very important to her (p. 190). Care, according to Leininger, improves a person’s condition or prepares them for death (McCance et al. 1999).

Nurses must allow themselves to be present and empathic throughout each client encounter in order to achieve this. Nurses must not be afraid of their patients; instead, they must be unselfish and discuss topics such as life and death with them. Caring, according to Watson’s thesis, is a conviction and attitude that becomes your purpose, aim, or promise, which you attain by sincere acts (McCance et al. 1999). Watson places a premium on transpersonal caring, which entails effective nurse-client contact.

My ability to provide selfless service stems from my faith in God’s word; both the recipient and I profit from it. Watson also outlines 10 caring factors, which are made up of concepts she believes are essential for helping people, as well as nursing abilities (McCance et al. 1999). Using these elements as a guide, every nurse can engage in self-actualization and improve their nursing skills.

Contribution to the Profession of Nursing

How will you contribute to the nursing profession?

My goals are to work at St. Francis Medical Center in Monroe, LA once I finish my Bachelors of Science in Nursing because the hospital believes in continuing Jesus Christ’s ministry. I’m confident that as a new graduate, I’ll only be able to work in particular departments, but I’d like to eventually work in the pediatric unit.

I intend to join the Society for Pediatric Nurses once I have obtained my pediatric nursing license since it is a “broad-based pediatric nursing organization formed for all nurses working in the care of children and families” (Miles, 1996). I also intend to join Nurses Christian Fellowship because it will enable me to carry out my personal relationship with God via nursing while also allowing me to interact with other nurses who share my values.

I plan to return to graduate school to pursue a Doctorate of Nursing Practice after at least ten years as a pediatric nurse. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner will be my specialization (PNP). Following graduation, I plan to work as a pediatric nurse practitioner; however, I am unsure of my geographic location.

In addition, I intend to become a member of the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. My ultimate ambition is to build a pediatric after-hours clinic, possibly in Monroe, Louisiana, where I grew up. In addition, regardless matter where I live, I intend to continue to be a good citizen, exercising my voting rights and encouraging others to do the same.

Conclusion

I’ve given my definition of the nursing profession as well as the nursing mission. This paper necessitated a lot of self-reflection. As a result, it’s no surprise that my personal ideas and experiences influenced the outcome. Analyses of nurse theorists allowed me to go deeper into assumptions and evidence-based studies about the profession, allowing me to better comprehend a profession that would one day be a part of my everyday existence. I believe that a personal definition of nursing is vital.

 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

1. What is nursing in simple words?

Nursing entails not only comprehending but also applying a variety of nursing and non-nursing ideas, as well as state nurse practice statutes and the Nurse Code of Ethics. Nursing is a comprehensive approach that combines beliefs, skills, ethical duties, and the application of a particular body of knowledge.

2. What is unique about nursing?

Nursing does not have a predetermined educational path or a limited number of chances. Comparing and contrasting nursing with other professions highlights nursing’s fundamental uniqueness. Though both healthcare disciplines, evidence-based medicine, and evidence-based nursing have major differences. Nurses work with people’s reactions to health and illness. Nursing takes each client’s needs into account and involves a balance of “doing” and “being with” (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2002).

3. Why is caring An important concept of nursing?

The profession of nursing is arguably driven by compassion. For a long time, research and theories on the concept of caring have been a part of the nursing profession. Nurses build bonds with their patients, their families, and their coworkers. Nurses frequently enter these interactions with a focus on deliberate caring, followed by respect and good listening. Understanding the mutual and reciprocal components of caring enables nurses to see beyond themselves or their ego and into a realm of possibilities

4. What is an example of nursing philosophy?

My personal perspective is that selfless service pleases God and his plan for my life and that it is my responsibility to serve not only the Lord, but also mankind with passion, dedication, and humility. My philosophy is based on my understanding of the Gospels or the Holy Bible, and it is supported by my own experience. My philosophy reflects my personal beliefs, which lead me to choose nursing as my major and future career.

Personal Definition of Nursing

 

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