The Significance of Reflective Practice, Advantages and Disadvantages of Reflective Practice, and Models and Stages of Reflective Practice.

The Significance of Reflective Practice, Advantages and Disadvantages of Reflective Practice, and Models and Stages of Reflective Practice.

The Significance of Reflective Practice

This project will look at the significance of reflective practice, advantages and disadvantages of reflective practice, and models and stages of reflective practice. For health practitioners, the ability to become introspective in practice has become a vital skill. This is to ensure that health professionals continue to learn and improve their practice on a regular basis. Reflective practice plays a key influence in healthcare today and is getting increasingly recognized.

What is reflective practice?

One of the most important methods to learn from our experiences is through reflective practice. Reflective practice is defined as using our experiences as a springboard for learning and improving our skills (Jasper, 2003). Reflective practice, according to Jasper (2003), consists of three elements:

  • Things that happened to the person (experiences).
  • The mechanisms that allow a person to learn from their experiences by reflecting on them.
  • The activities that arise as a result of the new perspectives that have been adopted.

Reflection is a skill that can be cultivated as part of reflective practice. It’s a way of adjusting to life as a licensed healthcare practitioner while also fostering the growth of a professional identity (Atwal & Jones, 2009). A process of reasoned contemplation can be described as reflection. It allows the practitioner to evaluate themselves and their approach to practice critically (Fleming, 2006).

‘Reflection-in-action’ and ‘Reflection-on-action,’ according to Schön (1987), are two types of reflection that can be used in healthcare. Coming across situations and difficulties that require thought and problem-solving while practicing is known as reflection-in-action. It’s also known as doing something while thinking about it. Reflection-on-action entails revisiting and analyzing past experiences in order to improve skills and improve future practice.

Advantages and Disadvantages of Reflective Practice

Why is Reflective Practice Important in Healthcare?

Reflective practice is an important part of continuous professional development for healthcare practitioners, and it is needed by all regulatory authorities in order to keep their licenses (Atwal & Jones, 2009). However, according to Driscoll (2006), reflective practice is frequently portrayed as a choice for health professionals, whether or not to be reflective on their clinical practice. Incorporating reflection into therapeutic practice has a number of advantages.

Reflection allows health professionals to share their expertise with others, benefiting practice, and assisting practitioners in making sense of difficult and complex situations (Chapman et al, 2008). This aids in the optimization of their work practices as well as the improvement of interprofessional partnerships.

Reflection allows us to look at our activity objectively in order to improve the quality of our work performance. Reflection can also reveal strengths and flaws, allowing for better development of areas that need to be improved.

Advantages of Reflective Practice

  • enables us to recognize our strengths and weaknesses so that we can improve our development.
  • enables us to apply reflection skills to the CPD cycle.
  • According to Atwal and Jones (2009), reflective practice can help people gain a better understanding of themselves as practitioners and people, which can lead to chances for professional development and personal improvement.
  • According to Driscoll (2006), if a commitment to this activity is made, it can enhance practice and alter healthcare.

What are the challenges of reflective practice?

There are acknowledged impediments to practitioners’ ability to reflect properly. Because of the hectic work environment in which practitioners work, Smythe (2004) asks whether there is any time to ponder and reflect. One of the downsides of not being able to reflect on practice is the lack of time.

Challenges of Reflective Practice

  • Time motivation, early expertise, and a lack of peer support are all issues that need to be addressed.
  • Organizational culture.
  • Preconceived notions that it will be too tough or ineffective.

Models and Stages of Reflective Practice

There are many various types of reflection models, and this article will provide some examples. Although the structure and content of these models differ, they nonetheless have a number of characteristics.

What are the stages of reflective practice?

A description of what happened is usually the first step in reflection. It’s critical to figure out what the crucial features are at this point — what makes this an occurrence worth reflecting on? This starting point is a low or superficial level of reflection.

An unfavorable or unpleasant circumstance (a ‘critical occurrence’) frequently encourages reflection. “We learn from our mistakes,” as the saying goes. Positive experiences, on the other hand, can also lead to introspection. Reflecting on what worked in order to duplicate it can be highly effective.

The consequent stages of reflection need you to apply what you’ve learned so far about the circumstance — how does theory fit in? It’s also important to be aware of your own feelings, preconceptions, and lack of understanding — what did you bring to the situation that had an impact? What did you leave out (information, openness) that could have changed the situation? Making sense of all of these variables allows you to recognize what you’ve learned and what changes you should make in the future.

The ultimate stage of reflection is one of transformation, such as in how you see yourself, others, your beliefs, values, perspectives, and/or opinions. It is the most profound level of contemplation.

What are the 3 models of reflective practice?

Graham Gibbs created the Gibbs Reflective Cycle in 1988 to give structure to learning from events. It provides a framework for analyzing experiences, and because of its cyclic character, it lends itself well to repeated encounters, allowing you to learn and prepare from things that went well or poorly. It is divided into six stages:

Gibbs' Reflective Model
The Significance of Reflective Practice, Advantages and Disadvantages of Reflective Practice, and Models and Stages of Reflective Practice.
  • The experience’s description
  • Thoughts and feelings about the experience
  • An assessment of the experience, both positive and negative
  • To make sense of the circumstance, conduct an analysis.
  • Finally, consider what you’ve learned and what you may have done differently.
  • Make a strategy for how you’ll handle such events in the future, or make any other changes you think are necessary.

Atkins and Murphy Reflective Model

The Atkins and Murphy model of reflection was created in 1994 by S. Atkins and K. Murphy, as the name suggests. The model was developed with the goal of analyzing an individual’s experience in order to identify areas for improvement, a process known as reflective practice.

It’s frequently utilized by professionals who wish to keep learning. It is thought that taking a proactive approach to reflective practice will aid in the development of professional competencies and abilities since it drives people to examine their discomforts and then learn from them. Individuals avoid confronting earlier habits and acts because it can be an unpleasant experience. However, discomforts are necessary for improvement, according to the Atkins and Murphy model of reflection.

Reflective practice is often avoided since it requires a proactive mindset to examine things that did not go well. Various scholars who have investigated reflective practice models have stated that individuals will find it simpler to undertake reflective practice if they think about their discomforts frequently. The use of this model has demonstrated that conducting reflective practice has a learning effect. This indicates that participants in reflective practice will find it simpler to reflect on prior discomforts.

Atkins and Murphy reflective model
The Significance of Reflective Practice, Advantages and Disadvantages of Reflective Practice, and Models and Stages of Reflective Practice.

For a thorough reflection, the Atkins and Murphy reflection model identified five elements organized in a clockwise circular cycle. The model begins with consciousness and progresses to descriptions, analyses, evaluations, and identification.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John’s Reflective Model

Christopher Johns developed the Johns Model of Reflection (MSR) as a model for structured reflection. The concept was created in the early 1990s at the Burford Nursing Development Unit for the nursing industry. The approach was motivated by research undertaken by Johns, in which he examined the interaction between professionals and their supervisors. The approach can be used to not just reflect on and analyze difficult decisions, but also to learn to critically reflect.

He concentrated on identifying and expressing knowledge that is applied in practice. To enhance reflection, Johns designed a framework that consists of five trigger questions that are then separated into more detailed questions. While thinking, Johns argued that one should have an internal and outward focus. An internal focus is concerned with one’s own feelings and thoughts, whereas an exterior focus is concerned with the facts of the situation or happenings. This is accomplished by answering the prompt questions for each phase.

The following signals are provided to assist practitioners in gaining access to, making sense of, and learning from their experiences.

Description

Write a narrative about your experience.
What are the most important aspects of this description to which I should pay attention?

Reflection

What exactly was I attempting to accomplish?
Why did I behave the way I did?
What are the ramifications of my choices?
For the benefit of the patient and their family
How did I feel about this event when it was happening, for myself and for the individuals I work with?
What was the patient’s reaction?
How do I know the patient’s reaction to it?

Factors that have an impact

What internal influences have an impact on my decisions and actions?
What outside influences influenced my decisions and actions?
What sources of information influenced my decision-making and actions, or should have influenced my decision-making and actions?
Alternative approaches
Could I have handled the issue better?
I didn’t have many other options.
What would the ramifications of these other options be?

Learning

In light of previous experience and future practice, how can I make meaning of this event?

What am I thinking now about this experience?
As a result of this experience, have I taken effective action to support myself and others?
In practice, how has this event affected my method of knowing?

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

1. What is reflective practice in healthcare?

Reflective practice is defined as using our experiences as a springboard for learning and improving our skills (Jasper, 2003). Reflective practice, according to Jasper (2003), consists of three elements:

  • Things that happened to the person (experiences).
  • The mechanisms that allow a person to learn from their experiences by reflecting on them.
  • The activities that arise as a result of the new perspectives that have been adopted.

2. What are the benefits of reflective practice in health and social care?

Reflective practice is an important part of continuous professional development for healthcare practitioners, and it is needed by all regulatory authorities in order to keep their licenses (Atwal & Jones, 2009).

3. What are the negatives of reflection?

  • Time motivation, early expertise, and a lack of peer support are all issues that need to be addressed.
  • Organizational culture.
  • Preconceived notions that it will be too tough or ineffective.

4. What is the Johns model of reflection?

He concentrated on identifying and expressing knowledge that is applied in practice. To enhance reflection, Johns designed a framework that consists of five trigger questions that are then separated into more detailed questions. While thinking, Johns argued that one should have an internal and outward focus. An internal focus is concerned with one’s own feelings and thoughts, whereas an exterior focus is concerned with the facts of the situation or happenings. This is accomplished by answering the prompt questions for each phase.

The Significance of Reflective Practice, Advantages and Disadvantages of Reflective Practice, and Models and Stages of Reflective Practice.

 

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